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Visual History of Telecommunications


Visual History of Telecommunications
Video montage prepared to help kick-off Location 2.0 Summit 2009 at CTIA in San Diego

– Telecommunications evolution from 1850s thru Oct 8, 2009

– Edited from public domain & marketing footage by companies across the globe

– Mashed to Energy52 mix by Solar Stone

Overarching Theme: Connecting People, Content & Service

Topics covered include:
– Telephony
– Telegraph
– Transoceanic submarine cable
– Switching
– Routing
– Satellite
– Internet
– Data
– Mobile
– Devices
– Netbooks
– Media/Content
– Convergence
– GPS
– Mapping
– browsers
– Location Based Services (LBS)
– Social Networking

– Thanks to Liz at wirelessnvision for her input

Calling Cards and Misconceptions: Get the Truth

When it comes to using prepaid calling cards, there’s a lot of information out there. They’ve been around for a long time, and that means that there’s been plenty of time for people to form opinions and come up with some gross misconceptions about these handy communication accessories.

Misconception 1: Phone Cards Don’t Work on Mobile Devices

While this can vary from carrier to carrier, most phone cards work just fine on mobile devices. Since you’re calling a local number to input your PIN and then connect to an external network, the call generally counts as local on your phone’s end. This does mean that you’ll have to pay for the local minutes you do use on the call, but it’s definitely better than dealing with exorbitant roaming charges.

Misconception 2: Calling Cards Only Work in Their Country of Origin

International phone cards are a booming business, so this misconception is pretty far-fetched; these are designed to allow you to call a different country while only paying a minimal local call charge rather than an astronomical international call charge, so having them be usable only in one country wouldn’t be very useful. This misconception probably comes from the fact that some calling cards offer coverage only in a handful of countries—usually the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Australia—thereby leading to a misunderstanding about their usability. However, these cards tend to be usable from either side of the pond, allowing two people in different countries to share the card and talk at their leisure. It’s usually a little cheaper to use a limited option card, but not always.

Misconception 3: Nobody Uses Phone Cards Anymore

While local phone cards may be less and less common as many mobile phone prices drop throughout the world, international calling cards are still the most economical way to keep in touch with friends, family and colleagues all over the globe. It’s common for businessmen traveling outside the country to use a calling card to contact their employers and loved ones back home, in order to keep down costs while away from home; it’s also popular for students studying abroad to have a calling card maintained by their parents, allowing them to call home whenever they want without running up a huge cell phone bill.

Phone cards are still a popular and functional option for keeping the cost of calling to a minimum. You may find that the truth of the matter opens up a plethora of options for keeping in touch—no matter where life takes you.


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